Tips for decreasing inflammation

If you exercise on a regular basis, you have no doubt faced some sort of nagging pain. It could be your sore shoulder after lifting weights. It might be a swollen Achilles tendon or burning IT band after running.

If you don’t think you suffered any structural damage and think you just have inflammation, are there steps you can take to decrease your pain?

Take a few days off.

Avoid the repetitive stresses that caused your shoulder, knee or ankle to ache in the first place. If you want to exercise anyway, try a routine that targets other body parts. If you normally run, switch to swimming or biking. Once your pain resolves, you can work back into your preferred exercise.

Ice after workouts.

Experts are starting to question the use of ice after traumatic injuries like fractures or ligament tears, but it can definitely decrease swelling. Ice wrap on injured kneePlus it can make that aching bone or joint feel better. Try ice on it for 20 minutes after a workout. Ice it several times throughout the day as well.

Consider anti-inflammatory medications.

Like ice, we are starting to question these medications, like ibuprofen and naproxen, after acute injuries such as fractures, as they could slow healing. Consider trying these medications for a short period of time, and watch for side effects like stomach pain.

Work with a physical therapist.

Physical therapists can evaluate your pain and take steps to get you better. They can strengthen and stretch the injured area and teach you exercises that you can do on your own. Plus they have modalities like ultrasound and dry needling that might help. South Carolina allows direct access to physical therapists without a doctor’s referral. You can work with the therapist for up to 30 days before you need a prescription from a doctor.

Also read:
Take anti-inflammatory medications safely
Avoid injuries when starting to jog

See a doctor.

If you aren’t getting better with rest, activity modification, ice and other simple measures, consider going to your doctor or an orthopedic surgeon. You might worry that we will try to talk you into surgery or giving up your activity. But we want to get you back to your sport or exercise. Often we can find a simple underlying cause for your pain and suggest some straightforward options to get you back to what you love to do.

Have you dealt with a nagging pain that made playing your sport or exercise difficult? What did you do about it? Please share your thoughts below!

3 Responses to Tips for decreasing inflammation

  1. Why would ice cause the pain to increase to the point it is not tolerable. And can a torn ligament in your knee be okay for a few months but start to bother you again if you try to get back into running or even to sit comfortably in a vechile. Lastly is stiffness in the knee considered as swelling? I have been trying to deal with a knee injury since last year.

    • Ice can be uncomfortable, but using it for 20 minutes or so can help decrease swelling of the knee for many patients.

Leave a reply

applications-education-miscellaneous.png
Please note: I cannot and will not provide specific medical information within these comments, just as I won't anywhere else. Also, I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive, off-topic, or spam. If you have questions, please read My Comments Policy.
 

ABOUT ME
david-headshot I am an orthopaedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist in Charleston, South Carolina.

On this blog, on my podcast, and in articles for numerous publications and in media interviews, I aim to provide you leading commentary and education on injury treatment and prevention to keep you performing at your best! Learn more about me >>


MEDIA

I'm excited to help with information and interviews for print, radio, television, and online media. Media information >>

WRITING

Writing I write articles and columns for a number of publications and organizations. Writing information >>
Sports Medicine Simplified: A Glossary of Sports Injuries, Treatments, Prevention and Much More

glossary-cover
Learn more about the glossary >>
© 2017 Dr. David Geier Enterprises, LLC

Site Designed by Launch Yourself